Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Live from the Seattle SlutWalk

Below are live photos from the 2011 Seattle SlutWalk.

A video of The Seattle SlutWalk is available here: http://www.seattlerex.com/video-the-seattle-slutwalk/

The SlutWalk

The SlutWalk

Walking Down Pine Street

Walking Down Pine Street

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

Big Turnout at 5th and Pine

Big Turnout at 5th and Pine

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SLUTWALK

SLUTWALK

Marching Down Pine Street

Marching Down Pine Street

The SlutWalk

The SlutWalk

SlutWalk Supporters

SlutWalk Supporters

Marching Down Pine Street

Marching Down Pine Street

Police Presence

Police Presence

Police Presence

Police Presence

Marching Down Pine Street

Marching Down Pine Street

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

Marching Down Pine Street

Marching Down Pine Street

Marching Toward Westlake Center

Marching Toward Westlake Center

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs at Westlake Park

SlutWalk Signs at Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk Signs

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

SlutWalk in Westlake Park

28 comments to Live from the Seattle SlutWalk

  • Samuel Schimmel

    Another side-note regarding comments about competing world issues… I wonder, do you think victim-blaming isn’t a concern, or just that it isn’t a priority? If it’s the latter, I don’t think this is a valid criticism of SWS because we’re not stopping you or anyone else from addressing these other concerns you list on the video page, and I know I didn’t take time off from solving world hunger to organize SlutWalk. Most everyone has something about the world they’d like to change, and you can appreciate the gravity of other concerns while doing something about those that are nearest and dearest to your heart, especially since these causes draw effort and funds from different resource pools a lot of the time – SlutWalk draws a lot of young people who aren’t (yet) equipped with the experience and know-how to take on inflation, foreclosure, and healthcare costs, but who have been assaulted or are close to someone who has been assaulted and want to stand up for them. In either case providing a forum for people to get civically involved is never a bad thing these days.

  • Samuel Schimmel

    A few more points…

    a) I feel like you’re painting this as (exclusively) a white woman’s problem. It’s not. Victims are blamed all the time in our society (another example that comes to mind for me is poor/single parent/etc. families who are blamed for their or their children’s shortcomings when structural factors are what keep them from succeeding). Victim-blaming in assault cases in particular affects people of all genders, races, classes, orientations, etc., especially minorities, hence the diversity in our speaker’s line-up (2/7 were people of color; at least 3/7 were queer, one of whom I believe was transgender) and also in our attendees.

    b) while victim-blaming includes (way too common) sentiments like “she deserved it,” we define it more broadly as placing the burden of violence prevention of the victim. It can be more subtle and implicit i.e. Sanguinetti’s statement, and we feel those attitudes feed into the more tangible kind of victim-blaming that denies victims justice because of what they were wearing or how they behaved (or were perceived to have been behaving). I wish victim-blaming was limited to what some cop said 3k miles away. :/

    c) you don’t believe SWs around the world changed or will change anything, which leads me to ask again, do you think victim-blaming’s a problem at all? If so, I’d say that SW isn’t the first, the only, or the last movement addressing it. It can’t and won’t change everything on it’s own. That’s okay. It’s starting a lot of important conversations like this one that I hope will, overtime, at least shift some attitudes. You may not think that validates the hundreds of volunteer hours I poured into this “political masturbation” over the past two months, but because I feel so strongly about this cause, and because I know in a liberal democracy peaceful demonstrations are one of our best means of effecting change, that’s enough for me.

  • Seattle Rex Seattle Rex

    I’m sure I don’t have to tell you, but there is a large amount of anti-intellectualism permeating our culture, and most consensus is reached these days on the basis of who can shout the loudest and ostracize the greatest.

    You make a lot of good points, and I have taken these points. I’m not sure if they have changed my mind necessarily, but I think you have done a very good job giving more credibility to the walk than I (and I’m sure others) otherwise might have given it. It really appears that you are advocating from a position of good-faith.

    I do have some specific rebuttals, and I will answer some of your questions when I get to a stopping point later.

  • Seattle Rex Seattle Rex

    Samuel,

    I can really appreciate your passion and commitment to this particular cause. I am glad there are people like you in the world.

    That being said, when it comes to some of the main feminist issues of the day, personally, I have a hard time getting past the fraud.

    “15 out of 16 rapists go free”, “Domestic violence is highest on Super Bowl Sunday”, “1/4 of women are raped by age 25”, etc, etc, etc.

    And women believe this? How can we trust such flawed judgement? When an entire movement willingly calls innocent people “rapists”, how can we take anything else seriously? That’s a tough thing to get past. Some would say it is an impossible thing to get past.

    I have also received a lot of “hate” email over this subject. On two of those occasions, I was threatened with bodily harm. Ironically, both threatened to castrate me.

    Now, maybe it’s just me, but I find it hard to accept an anti-violence message from people who threaten to mutilate my genitalia.

    There is a real tolerance problem in the tolerance movement, which is to say, there is none. “See it my way or die” is no different from the bible-thumping Baptists, and in my opinion, most modern-day social movements are little more than hate groups with better PR.

    Now, I know that two people do not make a movement, but if you march down Pine Street because a single cop 3,000 miles away makes an offhand remark, to what extent will you go to cull those who advocate violent genital mutilation from your ranks?

    The question is rhetorical, but you can see the condundrum. Before we tell others how to act, we need to get our own house in order and all that.

    Those are some of my general problems with the movement.

    Now, on to some more specific questions:

    Women’s bodies are not property/hate speech (I know this doesn’t answer the analogy but it’s worth pointing out)

    I’m not sure what this has to do with anything.

    If I walk through Compton at 1am simply because I have a right to, and I am shot dead, my body is not anyone’s property, but what does it matter?

    If it’s not safe to walk through Compton at 1am, and you failed to tell me this to avoid a politically-correct label, then shame on you. You were more concerned with being popular than you were about my safety.

    Yes, shame on the murderer too, but shame on you as well, and to some extent … shame on me.

    Life is complicated. Telling rapists not to rape, and murderers not to murder shows a lack of understanding of this basic premise.

    I wish that we could live life by bumper stickers and slogans scrawled on cardboard boxes, but unfortunately, it’s not possible.

    If your property is stolen or you are non-sexually assaulted, regardless of the cirumstances, the court will not deny your ability to press charges or commute the perpetrator’s sentence because of the area you were in or how you were behaving (if “s/he had it coming” was a valid defense in other cases, the Westboro Baptist Church wouldn’t make a killing baiting people into attacking them) (see: http://slutwalkseattle.com/faqs). If you’re a victim of violence because of any of a number of particular aspects of your identity (chosen or not), the perpetrator will be punished even more heavily because it’s considered a hate crime. With sexual violence, if that part of your identity is your attire, and that attire is percieved to be “slutty” (something that’s completely relative), the perpetrator will be punished LESS.

    Of course they will. At least to some degree. The court always considers the possibility of “mitigating circumstances”?

    “In criminal law, conditions or happenings which do not excuse or justify criminal conduct, but are considered out of mercy or fairness in deciding the degree of the offense the prosecutor charges or influencing reduction of the penalty upon conviction. Example: a young man shoots his father after years of being beaten, belittled, sworn at and treated without love. “Heat of passion” or “diminished capacity” are forms of such mitigating circumstances.”

    There are all kinds of factors, such as willfulness, intent, and egregiousness that will cause people to receive different treatment by the court system.

    Now, are people punished less simply because a woman is wearing a short skirt?

    On that basis alone, I think it’s unlikely.

    I heard anecdotally of a case where a man was prosecuted for raping a prostitute, and his punishment was light because it was later revealed that he simply didn’t pay her (or something to that effect), but he didn’t get off simply because she was wearing a short skirt. It was because the sex was otherwise consensual. My guess is that most feminist groups would interpret her short skirt as the one and only reason he was spared.

    In 2011, in the USA, I think you will find that “slutty attire” is not a common reason for exoneration.

    Our research into sexual violence suggests that attire actually doesn’t provoke sexual violence. The vast majority of sexual violence takes place by someone who knows the victim, often in the victim’s own home. With sexual violence, sex as a factor is secondary to power. People of all ages, genders, and abilities are victims of sexual violence. Provocative behavior is a factor in only 4.4% of sexual assault cases versus 22% of murder cases. Most rapists don’t even remember what their victim was wearing. On a strictly rational level, knowing what we know about the nature of sexual violence, it just doesn’t make sense that attire would provoke assault because rape isn’t a crime of opportunity. It generally involves a lot of planning and a tremendous amount of risk. Most men – rapists included – aren’t rape robots who instantly attack at the sight of flesh (and those who do need to be institutionalized). They stalk, study, and often groom their victims for great lengths of time prior to the assault. Clothing just can’t be a factor there.

    I think you are misunderstanding the “clothing” angle.

    A general tenet for optimal street safety is simply to not stand out. Standing out could be wearing an expensive watch, carrying an expensive phone, being obviously intoxicated, and yes, wearing revealing clothes.

    If you want to decrease your chances for being a victim of street crime, be low key. Blend in and draw as little attention to yourself as possible. This is what I advocate people do if they are by themselves.

    Note that this does not just go for women, it goes for everyone.

    The caveat is that, if I dressed in a revealing manner, more people would be repulsed by me than attracted to me. They would probably want to get as far away from me as possible.

    For young females, of course, the reverse is true. Attractive females will naturally get attention, and the more revealing they dress, the more attention they will receive. Be it rape, robbery, or simply verbal abuse, this attention is almost always a negative thing.

    When I advise (and I think this is the case for most people) others to cover up, dress down, and be cool, it is because on the street … anonymity is your friend. We don’t target what we don’t notice.

    Again, I think you are approaching the “dress conservatively” comments as more sinister than they were intended.

    Given this, empowering (potential) victims to protect themselves is all fine and good, through sensible means like learning a martial art, carrying a weapon, staying in groups, etc. It’s important we don’t become so obsessed with self-defense that we penalize victims for not taking such precautions (something we do constantly in our society). Ultimately, the only people who can truly “prevent” rape are the individuals committing it. If someone’s set on raping you, wearing an extra layer of clothing isn’t going to do you much good. The only tangible consequences I see in telling women they need to dress or behave a way in order to prevent their own victimization is that rapists get off because the defense can point to the victim’s short skirt, as well as the emotional trauma of victim-blaming many survivors go through in addition to the trauma of sexual assault.

    Can you point to some of these cases where rapists “got off” because the victim wore a short skirt?

    You see, I don’t think it happens very often. If this is truly institutionalized, then there should be an abundance of citations.

    You don’t believe SWs around the world changed or will change anything, which leads me to ask again, do you think victim-blaming’s a problem at all?

    “At all” is a catchall, so of course I would have to answer in the affirmative. Anything with an occurrence > 0 meets that definition.

    Is it prevalent, however?

    Somewhere, such as the Middle East, probably. Capitol Hill, Seattle? I doubt it.

    We think that, as a society, we can do better. The previous points are almost irrelevant because law enforcement telling women to make basic choices like how they dress out of fear of sexual violence just isn’t good enough. We’re doing SlutWalk to demand institutions, society, and media be held to higher standards.

    Is this really all that law enforcement does?

    You know, I’ve given the police a hard time myself lately, but your charge is patently unfair.

    The majority of rape charges result in an arrest. A majority of those arrested are prosecuted. A majority of those prosecuted are convicted.

    Yet, you are saying that all that law enforcement does is tell women how to dress. You are saying that institutions and society only blames the women.

    What you are saying is untrue, and frankly, it’s obvious that it’s not true.

    Society spends a large amount of time and resources trying to punish rapists. You know this.

    Side note 1: Sanguinetti’s remarks were just the catalyst for this. They’re endemic of our larger cultural attitude concerning sexual violence, and it isn’t just in Canada.

    Samuel, what color is the sky on your planet?

    In what culture are you immersed?

    Perhaps you need to stop hanging out with these people that advocate castration for dissenters.

    I know a lot of assholes, and exactly zero of them advocate rape or sexual violence. These things are not endemic to my culture. With all due respect, again, maybe you’re hanging out with the wrong people.

    I really don’t think we have a rape-worshipping culture. I doubt the Canadians do either.

    Then again, after Justin Bieber, I can believe just about anything about the Canadians. Talk about a cause for protest.

    Also, regarding your comment to anon that he/she could’ve prosecuted, it wasn’t up to them. Rape’s a crime against the state. The decision to prosecute isn’t in the victim’s hands.

    Then what was anon referring to when s(he) said:

    “As someone who was assaulted and didn’t go through with prosecuting, I can tell you that you’re full of shit.”

    Does not withholding assistance make prosecution more difficult? It’s hard to discuss the specifics of an anonymous comment.

    Another side-note regarding comments about competing world issues… I wonder, do you think victim-blaming isn’t a concern, or just that it isn’t a priority? If it’s the latter, I don’t think this is a valid criticism of SWS because we’re not stopping you or anyone else from addressing these other concerns you list on the video page, and I know I didn’t take time off from solving world hunger to organize SlutWalk. Most everyone has something about the world they’d like to change, and you can appreciate the gravity of other concerns while doing something about those that are nearest and dearest to your heart, especially since these causes draw effort and funds from different resource pools a lot of the time – SlutWalk draws a lot of young people who aren’t (yet) equipped with the experience and know-how to take on inflation, foreclosure, and healthcare costs, but who have been assaulted or are close to someone who has been assaulted and want to stand up for them. In either case providing a forum for people to get civically involved is never a bad thing these days.

    It’s a question of finite resources. Like you said, we can’t fight everything, so we have to pick our battles and prioritize.

    Marching because one man made a comment seems excessive and gratuitous to me. I know you are arguing that it is greater than this one guy, but how much larger is it, really? In my opinion, the problem of the police and the courts not prosecuting rapists is pretty small.

    Obviously, there has to be evidence that a rape occurred before we prosecute someone, but this is a good thing, no?

    while victim-blaming includes (way too common) sentiments like “she deserved it,” we define it more broadly as placing the burden of violence prevention of the victim. It can be more subtle and implicit i.e. Sanguinetti’s statement, and we feel those attitudes feed into the more tangible kind of victim-blaming that denies victims justice because of what they were wearing or how they behaved (or were perceived to have been behaving). I wish victim-blaming was limited to what some cop said 3k miles away. :/

    Again, who says “she deserved it”, and how often? I’m looking for actual case citations here.

    You are telling me that this happens, but I have lived in inner-cities all over this country and have not seen it.

    Do the judges and prosecutors who let these people off have a name?

    Is Sanguinetti’s your primary example? I hope not, because I have to tell you, I don’t think he said what you think he said.

    you don’t believe SWs around the world changed or will change anything, which leads me to ask again, do you think victim-blaming’s a problem at all?

    “At all”, sure. Any problem that has not been fully solved remains a problem to some degree.

    Is it prevalent?

    I don’t think that it is. I know that you disagree, and I believe you are sincere when you say that.

    However, when 80% of those arrested for rape are prosecuted, we reach an intellectual hurdle to overcome.

    If so, I’d say that SW isn’t the first, the only, or the last movement addressing it. It can’t and won’t change everything on it’s own. That’s okay. It’s starting a lot of important conversations like this one that I hope will, overtime, at least shift some attitudes. You may not think that validates the hundreds of volunteer hours I poured into this “political masturbation” over the past two months, but because I feel so strongly about this cause, and because I know in a liberal democracy peaceful demonstrations are one of our best means of effecting change, that’s enough for me.

    Well, that’s fair enough, and of course you don’t need my blessing.

    I would like to ask, however, do you think there is an abundance of rape proponents milling about Pike/Pine or Downtown Seattle?

    Maybe if you held this rally in Middle-Eastern countries where women were killed, I would understand, but in ultra-PC Seattle?

    While the folks marched with their “Rape is Bad” signs, part of me kept waiting for someone in a Captain Obvious costume to make an appearance.

    That being said, it’s important to realize that every movement needs good-faith detractors. A famous writer once told me “If at least 50% of your audience doesn’t hate you, you’re not writing anything worth reading. You’re irrelevant.” Obviously, I’ve taken this to heart, and I long ago stopped caring if people liked or even agreed with me. Hell, I would hate to live in a world where everyone agreed with me.

    I think that, as a passionate organizer, you should keep those words in mind as well. If your protests or rallies are not drawing critics, then your protests are not reaching enough people.

    Even though I don’t necessarily agree with your cause, you certainly have my respect. Doing something is always better than doing nothing. There is far too much apathy, sports-worship, and America-Idol zombieism in the world, and I tip my hat to anyone who gets off their ass and DOES SOMETHING. I’ll defend to my death your right to march wherever you damn well please. If someone tries to disrupt your people, I’ll fall in and personally take a bottle to the head. I was really glad that Westboro thing fizzled. If you think I’m hard on this stuff, you don’t want to see my reaction to the religious fuckbags.

    I think more pressing causes could use someone like you, but you have to follow your own heart and do what you think is right. If this is something that you think needs more attention, then you owe it to everyone, especially yourself, to yell as loud as you can.

    Do your thing, man. Be safe, and be well.

  • Gage

    We also need to stop all the crazy girls that falsey accuse guys of rape. Because i myself have been in that situation. Falsey accused when i had done nothing wrong, and the fucked up thing is that it’s always her words against his, which people tend to beleive her. I am very lucky that bitch didn’t ruin my life. She tried taking it to court and everything and tried saying it happened on a week i was out of state. It’s kinda like how there is two sides to every argument. There will always be that girl that fucked a guy willingly then down the road gets her feelings hurt by so said individual, and craving attention like most female teenagers crosses the line and decides to tell that little lie, when it’s not a “little” deal at all. Where i’m from we tend to handle rapist our own way. And if anyone every did it to someone in my family i would be going to prison. Just had to put in my two cents and fucked up experience. Because maybe someday in the future i could save some guys ass or keep a girl from doing such a horrible heartless thing.

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>